‘The Bachelorette’: Jed Wyatt Comments on Hannah Brown’s Use of the N-Word

by Jeremy Spirogis
Jed Wyatt Hannah Brown

On May 16, Hannah Brown mentioned the N-word throughout an Instagram Live as she sang alongside to DaBaby’s “Rockstar.” Several folks in Bachelor Nation reacted to the video, and now Brown’s ex Jed Wyatt has commented on the state of affairs.

Jed Wyatt Hannah Brown
Jed Wyatt and Hannah Brown | John Fleenor by way of Getty Images

Hannah Brown apologized for utilizing the N-word

After Brown mentioned the N-word whereas singing to “Rockstar” on Instagram Live, followers referred to as her out within the feedback. She then posted a half-hearted apology whereas laughing on her Instagram.

“I did? I’m so sorry… No, I was singing… I’m so sorry,” she mentioned.

Brown later posted a brief apology on her Instagram story.

“I owe you all a major apology,” Brown wrote on her Instagram Story on May 17. “There is no excuse and I will not justify what I said. I have read your messages and seen the hurt I have caused. I own it all. I am terribly sorry and know that whether in public or private, this language is unacceptable. I promise to do better.” 

Bachelor Nation reacted to the state of affairs

Rachel Lindsay, the primary and solely black lead within the Bachelor franchise, posted an extended video to her Instagram IGTV web page addressing the state of affairs.

“I understand that an apology was made, but when I know what could have been done, when I know what I challenged someone to do, they did not do it. So I felt like I’ll use my platform to do it, because it’s easy to make a statement,” Lindsay mentioned. “It’s easy to hide behind words. But when you’re bold enough to say the N-word on camera, on your platform… you need to be bold enough to use your face on camera and apologize in the same way that you said the word.” 

RELATED: Rachel Lindsay Is ‘Offended’ That Hannah Brown Didn’t Take Her Advice On How to Apologize Following Her Saying a Racial Slur

Tyler Cameron seconded Lindsay’s feedback, and posted in regards to the state of affairs a number of instances on his Instagram story.

“Rachel hit the nail on the head,” Cameron wrote on his Instagram story. “Y’all need to go look at the comments. We have a long ways to go on this issue and a lot to learn. If you find yourself getting defensive, you are part of the problem. This is not about dragging HB. This is about using your platform for reasons like this. So we can educate those who don’t get it. This is bigger than HB. This is a societal problem.”

Cameron additionally inspired folks to elevate Brown up by love as a substitute of hate, as “She is learning and growing just like every single one of us.”

Jed Wyatt reacted to Hannah Brown saying the N-word

Mike Johnson, who competed for Brown’s coronary heart on The Bachelorette together with Cameron and Wyatt, revealed an inspiring Instagram post about how he views the affect of phrases as a black man.

View this post on Instagram

I can not faux to know what’s in anybody else’s coronary heart; all I can do is use this platform to share what’s in mine. Words are highly effective. We are accountable for our phrases – those we use in error and those we select fastidiously to construct a path ahead. Through my writing, I work to replicate on my private historical past as a black man – studying to forgive others and love myself, whereas striving to create a world the place all folks understand how vital their voices are and the way highly effective their phrases could be. I don’t imagine it’s the duty of black males or ladies on this nation to proceed bearing the emotional and mental burden of explaining our cultural hurts as we additionally attempt to heal from them. But, I do imagine we are able to elevate our society by open dialogue, considerate motion and storytelling that hopefully bridges cultures and generations. If we will not discuss our ache, we are able to by no means discover objective. If we are able to’t take heed to these in ache, we are able to by no means be taught true compassion. I stay up for the times forward when we’ve respectful conversations on this area, with an enriched sense of tradition, a broader training, and a deeper understanding and love for all folks. Cancellation solves nothing. Conversation solves the whole lot. Bottom line: let’s know the facility of our phrases and use them to unfold kindness, not hate. No one is ideal, we’re mearly mortals.

A post shared by Mike Johnson (@mikejohnson1_) on May 20, 2020 at 4:47pm PDT

“Words are highly effective. We are accountable for our phrases – those we use in error and those we select fastidiously to construct a path ahead.
Through my writing, I work to replicate on my private historical past as a black man,” he wrote on Instagram.

He continued, “I stay up for the times forward when we’ve respectful conversations on this area, with an enriched sense of tradition, a broader training, and a deeper understanding and love for all folks.
Cancellation solves nothing. Conversation solves the whole lot. Bottom line: let’s know the facility of our phrases and use them to unfold kindness, not hate. No one is ideal, we’re mearly mortals.”

Wyatt then commented on Johnson’s post, “Amen.”

While a small gesture, it appears Wyatt agrees with Johnson’s stance that phrases have that means, and that Brown must be educated as a substitute of canceled. So far, members of Bachelor Nation like Lindsay, Cameron, and Johnson have used their platform to begin a dialog and educate others about racism, however Brown has not posted on social media since her apology on May 17.

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